Unregulated hunting and genetic recovery from a severe population decline: the cautionary case of Bulgarian wolves

@article{Moura2013UnregulatedHA,
  title={Unregulated hunting and genetic recovery from a severe population decline: the cautionary case of Bulgarian wolves},
  author={A. Moura and Elena Tsingarska and M. Dąbrowski and Sylwia D. Czarnomska and B. Jędrzejewska and M. Pilot},
  journal={Conservation Genetics},
  year={2013},
  volume={15},
  pages={405-417}
}
European wolf (Canis lupus) populations have suffered extensive decline and range contraction due to anthropogenic culling. In Bulgaria, although wolves are still recovering from a severe demographic bottleneck in the 1970s, hunting is allowed with few constraints. A recent increase in hunting pressure has raised concerns regarding long-term viability. We thus carried out a comprehensive conservation genetic analysis using microsatellite and mtDNA markers. Our results showed high heterozygosity… Expand

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