Unpicking the privacy paradox: can structuration theory help to explain location-based privacy decisions?

@inproceedings{Zafeiropoulou2013UnpickingTP,
  title={Unpicking the privacy paradox: can structuration theory help to explain location-based privacy decisions?},
  author={Aristea-Maria Zafeiropoulou and David E. Millard and Craig Webber and Kieron O’Hara},
  booktitle={WebSci},
  year={2013}
}
Social Media and Web 2.0 tools have dramatically increased the amount of previously private data that users share on the Web; now with the advent of GPS-enabled smartphones users are also actively sharing their location data through a variety of applications and services. [] Key Result Our work has important consequences both for the understanding of how users arrive at privacy decisions, and also for the potential design of privacy systems.
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