Universals and cultural differences in the judgments of facial expressions of emotion.

@article{Ekman1987UniversalsAC,
  title={Universals and cultural differences in the judgments of facial expressions of emotion.},
  author={Paul Ekman and Wallace V. Friesen and M O'Sullivan and Anthony Chan and I Diacoyanni-Tarlatzis and K Heider and Rainer Krause and William A. LeCompte and Thomas K. Pitcairn and Pio Enrico Ricci-Bitti},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={1987},
  volume={53 4},
  pages={
          712-7
        }
}
We present here new evidence of cross-cultural agreement in the judgement of facial expression. Subjects in 10 cultures performed a more complex judgment task than has been used in previous cross-cultural studies. Instead of limiting the subjects to selecting only one emotion term for each expression, this task allowed them to indicate that multiple emotions were evident and the intensity of each emotion. Agreement was very high across cultures about which emotion was the most intense. The 10… 

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