Unintended pregnancy and taxpayer spending.

@article{Monea2011UnintendedPA,
  title={Unintended pregnancy and taxpayer spending.},
  author={Emily Monea and Adam Thomas},
  journal={Perspectives on sexual and reproductive health},
  year={2011},
  volume={43 2},
  pages={
          88-93
        }
}
CONTEXT Nearly half of all pregnancies in the United States are unintended. These pregnancies likely represent a substantial cost to taxpayers, but national-level estimates of these public costs have been lacking. METHODS Taxpayer spending on unintended pregnancy is measured by multiplying estimates of the 2001 incidence of publicly financed unintended pregnancy outcomes (abortions, fetal losses, births and need for infant medical care) by average per-incident costs. Public savings that would… Expand
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Public expenditures for the US family planning program not only prevented unintended pregnancies but also reduced the incidence and impact of preterm and LBW births, STIs, infertility, and cervical cancer. Expand
Original research article Burden of unintended pregnancy in the United States: potential savings with increased use of long-acting reversible contraception ☆
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Imperfect contraceptive adherence leads to substantial UP and high, avoidable costs, and improved uptake of LARC may generate health care cost savings by reducing contraceptive non-adherence. Expand
Estimated economic impact of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system on unintended pregnancy in active duty women.
TLDR
Use of LNG-IUS could result in significant reductions in unintended pregnancy among active duty women, resulting in substantial cost savings to the government health care system. Expand
The evidence mounts on the benefits of preventing unintended pregnancy.
TLDR
Three articles in the current issue of Contraception build on the existing literature and provide a roadmap to reducing individual and societal burdens to preventing unplanned pregnancies. Expand
The role of mass media campaigns in preventing unintended pregnancy
This short paper discusses the potential of advertising campaigns to reduce rates of unintended pregnancy in the United States. The author did a review research indicating that past campaignsExpand
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Public insurance programs are central in assisting American families in affording pregnancy and childbirth; however, they pay for a disproportionately high number of births resulting from unintended pregnancy, and the resulting budgetary impact warrants increased public efforts to reduce unintended pregnancy. Expand
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