Uninformed compliance or informed choice? A needed shift in our approach to cancer screening.

@article{Stefanek2011UninformedCO,
  title={Uninformed compliance or informed choice? A needed shift in our approach to cancer screening.},
  author={Michael Edward Stefanek},
  journal={Journal of the National Cancer Institute},
  year={2011},
  volume={103 24},
  pages={
          1821-6
        }
}
  • M. Stefanek
  • Published 21 December 2011
  • Medicine, Political Science
  • Journal of the National Cancer Institute
It has been more than 30 years since the first consensus development meeting was held to deal with guidelines of mammography screening. Although the National Cancer Institute has wisely focused on the science of screening and of screening benefits vs harm, many professional organizations, advocacy groups, and the media have maintained a focus on establishing who should be screened and promoting recommendations for which age groups should be screened. Guidelines have been developed not only for… 
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