Unidirectional rotary motion in a molecular system

@article{Kelly1999UnidirectionalRM,
  title={Unidirectional rotary motion in a molecular system},
  author={T. Ross Kelly and Harshani de Silva and Richard A. Silva},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1999},
  volume={401},
  pages={150-152}
}
The conversion of energy into controlled motion plays an important role in both man-made devices and biological systems. The principles of operation of conventional motors are well established, but the molecular processes used by ‘biological motors’ such as muscle fibres, flagella and cilia to convert chemical energy into co-ordinated movement remain poorly understood. Although ‘brownian ratchets’ are known to permit thermally activated motion in one direction only, the concept of channelling… Expand
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