Undesirable side effects of selection for high production efficiency in farm animals: a review

@article{Rauw1998UndesirableSE,
  title={Undesirable side effects of selection for high production efficiency in farm animals: a review},
  author={Wendy M. Rauw and Egbert Kanis and E. N. Noordhuizen-Stassen and F. J. Grommers},
  journal={Livestock Production Science},
  year={1998},
  volume={56},
  pages={15-33}
}

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