Undesirable and adverse effects of tooth-whitening products: a review

@article{Goldberg2009UndesirableAA,
  title={Undesirable and adverse effects of tooth-whitening products: a review},
  author={Michel E. Goldberg and Martin Grootveld and Edward Lynch},
  journal={Clinical Oral Investigations},
  year={2009},
  volume={14},
  pages={1-10}
}
Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a powerful oxidising agent. It gives rise to agents known to be effective bleaching agents. The mechanisms of bleaching involve the degradation of the extracellular matrix and oxidation of chromophores located within enamel and dentin. However, H2O2 produces also local undesirable effects on tooth structures and oral mucosa. In clinical conditions, the daily low-level doses used to produce tooth whitening never generate general acute and sub-acute toxic effects… 
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OBJECTIVE The aim is to review the most important aspects about tooth whitening treatments, their side effects, and the new emerging approaches to overcome them. OVERVIEW This review is focused on
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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