Undesirable aliens: factors determining the distribution of three invasive bird species in Singapore

@article{Lim2003UndesirableAF,
  title={Undesirable aliens: factors determining the distribution of three invasive bird species in Singapore},
  author={Haw Chuan Lim and Navjot S. Sodhi and Barry W. Brook and Malcolm C. K. Soh},
  journal={Journal of Tropical Ecology},
  year={2003},
  volume={19},
  pages={685 - 695}
}
Biological invasions are a major environmental concern due to their negative impacts on biodiversity and economics. We determined the population sizes and habitat-abundance relationships of the three most successful invasive bird species in Singapore: the house crow Corvus splendens, white-vented myna Acridotheres javanicus and common myna A. tristis. Estimated population sizes of the three species between February 2000 and February 2001 were between 106 000-176 000, 122 000-155 000 and 20 000… 

DECADAL CHANGES IN URBAN BIRD ABUNDANCE IN SINGAPORE

It is suggested that reduced density of house crow nests may actually result in increased vulnerability to, and hence success rate of, brood parasitism by the Asian koel, or there may be increased parasitism of other host species' nests.

Abundance and projected control of invasive house crows in Singapore

It is demonstrated that at least 41,000 crows will need to be culled in the first year of a control program, and equivalent effort committed each year thereafter, to be confident of suppressing the Singapore population from its 2001 density to the management target of <10 birds/km(2) within a 10-year period.

The distribution and spread of the invasive alien common myna, Acridotheres tristis L. (Aves: Sturnidae), in southern Africa

Investigation of the relationships between common myna distribution, human population size and land-transformation values at a quarter-degree resolution in South Africa indicates that, although there is some overlap, the commonMyna distribution is not closely tied to the spatial arrangement of protected areas.

Cane toads beneath bird rookeries: utilization of a natural disturbance by an invasive species

By magnifying pre-existing intraspecific divergences in habitat use, bird rookeries may enhance population viability of cane toads by enabling critical age and sex classes to exploit food-rich patches that are rarely used by adult males.

The importance of protected areas for species undergoing distribution changes

The value of Protected Areas for wildlife will diminish if the species for which they were originally designated are pushed out of their boundaries by changing temperatures, or if they are

The Common Myna (Sturnus tristis) in urban, rural and semi-rural areas in Greater Sydney and its surrounds

Comparison of distribution data across habitat types suggests that Mynas do not extend far beyond urban habitats, and Mynas were primarily observed in suburban-industrial areas, small suburban reserves or sporting grounds and roadsides in semi-rural areas, and that careful urban planning may reduce their distribution and potentially their impact.

Invasive species in Southeast Asia: the knowledge so far

  • K. Peh
  • Environmental Science
    Biodiversity and Conservation
  • 2009
A forward-looking agenda for the region should include improving the quality and quantity of biological invasion research; adopting a tough approach to the illegal release of wildlife; and applying multi-national strategies that integrate data sharing, prioritization, public awareness, policy work, capacity building, conservation actions and surveillance.

Saving two birds with one stone: solving the quandary of introduced, threatened species

Examples of the conservation dilemma posed by introduced, threatened species are described and ways to mitigate the threats presented by introduced populations – as well as the threats facing native populations – of the same species are highlighted.

Factors influencing the distribution of the invasive house crow (Corvus splendens) in rural and urban landscapes

House crows, Corvus splendens, are highly successful emigrants from the Indian subcontinent that have colonized urban and rural habitats in many locations in Asia. We conducted counts of crows,
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 51 REFERENCES

Abundance and projected control of invasive house crows in Singapore

It is demonstrated that at least 41,000 crows will need to be culled in the first year of a control program, and equivalent effort committed each year thereafter, to be confident of suppressing the Singapore population from its 2001 density to the management target of <10 birds/km(2) within a 10-year period.

The Ecology of the Common Myna in Urban Nature Reserves in the Australian Capital Territory

The ecology of the Common Myna in two urban nature reserves in Australia is examined, with evidence of differential use of habitat within reserves, with Common Mynas being more prevalent in reserve edges, than in interior or woodland areas.

Roost characteristics of invasive mynas in Singapore

Canopy density and food abundance manipulation experiments showed that although both resulted in a decrease in the number of roosting mynas, canopy density reduction had a greater effect, as predicted by the roost-selection model.

RELATIONSHIPS AMONG BREEDING BIRDS, HABITAT, AND RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT IN GREATER TUCSON, ARIZONA

Bird abundance trends have been correlated with habitat changes in urban developed areas but have seldom been associated with specific patterns of urban-related habitat changes. We examined breeding

BIOTIC INVASIONS: CAUSES, EPIDEMIOLOGY, GLOBAL CONSEQUENCES, AND CONTROL

Given their current scale, biotic invasions have taken their place alongside human-driven atmospheric and oceanic alterations as major agents of global change and left unchecked, they will influence these other forces in profound but still unpredictable ways.

BIRD-LANDSCAPE RELATIONS IN THE CHIHUAHUAN DESERT: COPING WITH UNCERTAINTIES ABOUT PREDICTIVE MODELS

During the springs of 1995–1997, we studied birds and landscapes in the Chihuahuan Desert along part of the Texas–Mexico border. Our objectives were to assess bird–landscape relations and their

Breeding Bird Abundance in an Urbanizing Landscape in Coastal Southern California

The relative influence of local versus landscape heterogeneity on species abundance is an important consideration in the design and management of nature reserves in heterogeneous landscapes. We
...