Underwater Sounds heard from Sperm Whales

@article{Worthington1957UnderwaterSH,
  title={Underwater Sounds heard from Sperm Whales},
  author={L. V. Worthington and William E. Schevill},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1957},
  volume={180},
  pages={291-291}
}
WHILE the sperm whale (Physeter catodon) is one of the more conspicuous cetaceans, it has not figured among the relatively few that have been demonstrated to make underwater sounds, although they have occasionally been suspected of doing so. We have now obtained reliable evidence that they, too, are soniferous. 
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