Understanding the social effects of emotion regulation: the mediating role of authenticity for individual differences in suppression.

@article{English2013UnderstandingTS,
  title={Understanding the social effects of emotion regulation: the mediating role of authenticity for individual differences in suppression.},
  author={Tammy English and Oliver P. John},
  journal={Emotion},
  year={2013},
  volume={13 2},
  pages={
          314-329
        }
}
Individuals differ in the strategies they use to regulate their emotions (e.g., suppression, reappraisal), and these regulatory strategies can differentially influence social outcomes. However, the mechanisms underlying these social effects remain to be specified. We examined one potential mediator that arises directly from emotion-regulatory effort (expression of positive emotion), and another mediator that does not involve emotion processes per se, but instead results from the link between… Expand
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Perceived emotion suppression and culture: Effects on psychological well-being.
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  • Psychology, Medicine
  • International journal of psychology : Journal international de psychologie
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TLDR
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