Understanding the cumulative impacts of inequalities in environmental health: implications for policy.

@article{MorelloFrosch2011UnderstandingTC,
  title={Understanding the cumulative impacts of inequalities in environmental health: implications for policy.},
  author={Rachel Morello-Frosch and Miriam Zuk and Michael Jerrett and Bhavna Shamasunder and Amy D. Kyle},
  journal={Health affairs},
  year={2011},
  volume={30 5},
  pages={
          879-87
        }
}
Racial or ethnic minority groups and low-income communities have poorer health outcomes than others. They are more frequently exposed to multiple environmental hazards and social stressors, including poverty, poor housing quality, and social inequality. Researchers are grappling with how best to characterize the cumulative effects of these hazards and stressors in order to help regulators and decision makers craft more-effective policies to address health and environmental disparities. In this… Expand

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