Understanding the Transsexual Patient: Culturally Sensitive Care in Emergency Nursing Practice

@article{Polly2011UnderstandingTT,
  title={Understanding the Transsexual Patient: Culturally Sensitive Care in Emergency Nursing Practice},
  author={Ryan G. Polly and Julie Nicole},
  journal={Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal},
  year={2011},
  volume={33},
  pages={55–64}
}
Transsexual individuals present to the emergency department for various reasons; yet, providers and nurses are often unaware of the unique needs of transsexual patients. This article provides an understanding of challenges faced by transsexual individuals in health care access and treatment. The authors explain commonly used terminology and provide an overview of the transition process including the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th edition criteria for diagnosis and the World Professional… 

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