Understanding the Nature of Face Processing Impairment in Autism: Insights From Behavioral and Electrophysiological Studies

@article{Dawson2005UnderstandingTN,
  title={Understanding the Nature of Face Processing Impairment in Autism: Insights From Behavioral and Electrophysiological Studies},
  author={Geraldine Dawson and Sara Jane Webb and James C. McPartland},
  journal={Developmental Neuropsychology},
  year={2005},
  volume={27},
  pages={403 - 424}
}
This article reviews behavioral and electrophysiological studies of face processing and discusses hypotheses for understanding the nature of face processing impairments in autism. Based on results of behavioral studies, this study demonstrates that individuals with autism have impaired face discrimination and recognition and use atypical strategies for processing faces characterized by reduced attention to the eyes and piecemeal rather than configural strategies. Based on results of… 
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