Understanding the Adoption of Voter Identification Laws in the American States

@article{Biggers2017UnderstandingTA,
  title={Understanding the Adoption of Voter Identification Laws in the American States},
  author={Daniel R. Biggers and Michael J. Hanmer},
  journal={American Politics Research},
  year={2017},
  volume={45},
  pages={560 - 588}
}
Recently, many states have reversed the decades-long trend of facilitating ballot access by enacting a wave of laws requesting or requiring identification from registrants before they vote. Identification laws, however, are not an entirely new phenomenon. We offer new theoretical insights regarding how changes in political power influence the adoption of identification laws. In the most extensive analysis to date, we use event history analysis to examine why states adopted a range of… 

Tables from this paper

Partisan Strategy and the Adoption of Same-Day Registration in the American States

Abstract This study seeks to explain state adoptions of same-day registration (SDR), with a focus on determining whether the Democratic (Republican) Party’s support of (resistance to) this impactful

The Racial Implications of Voter Identification Laws in America

Over 40 states have considered voter identification laws in recent years, with several adopting laws requiring voters to show a valid ID before they cast a ballot. We argue that such laws have a

Voting Restrictions and Representation in Congress∗

State and local governments have implemented a number of election administration policies that restrict access to the ballot. What are the effects of these electoral reforms on who votes and the

The Determinants of State Legislator Support for Restrictive Voter ID Laws

We examine state legislator behavior on restrictive voter identification (ID) bills from 2005 to 2013. Partisan polarization of state lawmakers on voter ID laws is well known, but we know very little

Ballot Challenge: Explaining Voting Rights Restrictions in 21st-Century America

Over the past decade, the United States has seen a wave of restrictive voting laws unprecedented since the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. This project uses a survival analysis technique

A disproportionate burden: strict voter identification laws and minority turnout

ABSTRACT Critics of the recent proliferation of strict photo identification laws claim these laws impose a disproportionate burden on racial minorities. Yet, empirical studies of the impact of these

Voter Identification Laws and Turnout in the United States

This article analyzes voter identification laws in the United States and their effects on voter turnout. Theoretically, there are plausible reasons to hypothesize turnout lowering effects, though

The Rule, Not the Exception: One-Party Monopolies in the American States

Abstract Thousands of studies have examined party competition in the American states, finding significant consequences for voter turnout, policy adoptions, and more. Long-term patterns of party

The Suppressive Impacts of Voter Identification Requirements

Political observers argue that the United States is in a contemporary era of voter suppression. We study one mechanism that may limit voter participation, the requirement to show identification

A Principle or a Strategy? Voter Identification Laws and Partisan Competition in the American States

We undertake a comprehensive examination of restrictive voter ID legislation in the American states from 2001 through 2012. With a dataset containing approximately one thousand introduced and nearly

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 65 REFERENCES

The Disproportionate Impact of Voter-ID Requirements on the Electorate—New Evidence from Indiana

  • M. Barreto
  • Law
    PS: Political Science & Politics
  • 2009
On January 8, 2008, the United States Supreme Court heard arguments in Crawford v. Marion County Election Board, a case related to the discriminatory effects of voter-identification laws in the state

The Politics of Race and Voter ID Laws in the States

Does partisan and racial context have an effect on the likelihood that states will adopt stringent requirements for voting? Our duration analysis shows that Republican governments increase the

Can Voter ID Laws Be Administered in a Race-Neutral Manner? Evidence from the City of Boston in 2008

Is it feasible in the current United States to administer voter identification laws in a race-neutral manner? We study this question using rigorous field methods and state-of-the-art statistical

Who Makes Voting Convenient? Explaining the Adoption of Early and No-Excuse Absentee Voting in the American States

Recent elections have witnessed substantial debate regarding the degree to which state governments facilitate access to the polls. Despite this newfound interest, however, many of the major reforms

Voter Identification Laws and Turnout in the United States

This article analyzes voter identification laws in the United States and their effects on voter turnout. Theoretically, there are plausible reasons to hypothesize turnout lowering effects, though

Politics is local: State legislator voting on restrictive voter identification legislation

The marked increase in restrictive voter identification (ID) laws since the 2010 elections reveals the extreme partisan polarization in those state legislatures advancing this reform. Unlike previous

Jim Crow 2.0? Why States Consider and Adopt Restrictive Voter Access Policies

Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in state legislation likely to reduce access for some voters, including photo identification and proof of citizenship requirements, registration

Modeling Problems in the Voter Identification—Voter Turnout Debate

85 IN APRIL 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Indiana’s controversial voter identification (ID) law. Adopted in 2005, the law requires voters to show a current, government-issued photo

Delegating Direct Democracy: Interparty Legislative Competition and the Adoption of the Initiative in the American States

Between 1898 and 1918, voters in 20 American states adopted constitutional amendments granting citizens the power of the initiative. The embrace of direct democracy by voters invites inquiry into why
...