Understanding normal and impaired word reading: computational principles in quasi-regular domains.

@article{Plaut1996UnderstandingNA,
  title={Understanding normal and impaired word reading: computational principles in quasi-regular domains.},
  author={David C. Plaut and James L. McClelland and Mark S. Seidenberg and Karalyn E Patterson},
  journal={Psychological review},
  year={1996},
  volume={103 1},
  pages={
          56-115
        }
}
A connectionist approach to processing in quasi-regular domains, as exemplified by English word reading, is developed. [] Key Result Further analyses of the ability of networks to reproduce data on acquired surface dyslexia support a view of the reading system that incorporates a graded division of labor between semantic and phonological processes, and contrasts in important ways with the standard dual-route account.

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