Understanding human ambivalence about sex: The effects of stripping sex of meaning

@article{Goldenberg2002UnderstandingHA,
  title={Understanding human ambivalence about sex: The effects of stripping sex of meaning},
  author={Jamie L. Goldenberg and Cathy R. Cox and Tom Pyszczynski and Jeff Greenberg and Sheldon Solomon},
  journal={The Journal of Sex Research},
  year={2002},
  volume={39},
  pages={310 - 320}
}
We offer a theoretical perspective to provide insight into why people are ambivalent about sex and why cultures regulate sex and attach symbolic meaning to it. Building on terror management theory, we propose that sex is problematic for humankind in part because it reminds us of our creaturely mortal nature. Two experiments investigated the effects of reminding people of the similarity between humans and other animals on their reactions to the physical aspects of sex. In Study 1, priming human… 

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