Understanding genetic risk for aggression: clues from the brain's response to social exclusion.

@article{Eisenberger2007UnderstandingGR,
  title={Understanding genetic risk for aggression: clues from the brain's response to social exclusion.},
  author={Naomi I. Eisenberger and Baldwin M. Way and Shelley E. Taylor and William T. Welch and Matthew D. Lieberman},
  journal={Biological psychiatry},
  year={2007},
  volume={61 9},
  pages={1100-8}
}
BACKGROUND Although research indicates a relationship between the monoamine oxidase-A (MAOA) gene and aggression, the intervening neural and psychological mechanisms are unknown. Individuals with the low expression allele (MAOA-L) of a functional polymorphism in the MAOA gene might be prone to aggression because they are socially or emotionally hyposensitive and thus care less about harming others or because they are socially or emotionally hypersensitive and thus respond to negative social… CONTINUE READING
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