Understanding and using the implicit association test: I. An improved scoring algorithm.

@article{Greenwald2003UnderstandingAU,
  title={Understanding and using the implicit association test: I. An improved scoring algorithm.},
  author={Anthony G Greenwald and Brian A. Nosek and Mahzarin R. Banaji},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2003},
  volume={85 2},
  pages={
          197-216
        }
}
In reporting Implicit Association Test (IAT) results, researchers have most often used scoring conventions described in the first publication of the IAT (A.G. Greenwald, D.E. McGhee, & J.L.K. Schwartz, 1998). Demonstration IATs available on the Internet have produced large data sets that were used in the current article to evaluate alternative scoring procedures. Candidate new algorithms were examined in terms of their (a) correlations with parallel self-report measures, (b) resistance to an… 

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