Understanding and capturing people’s privacy policies in a mobile social networking application

@article{Sadeh2008UnderstandingAC,
  title={Understanding and capturing people’s privacy policies in a mobile social networking application},
  author={Norman M. Sadeh and Jason I. Hong and Lorrie Faith Cranor and Ian Fette and Patrick Gage Kelley and Madhu K. Prabaker and Jinghai Rao},
  journal={Personal and Ubiquitous Computing},
  year={2008},
  volume={13},
  pages={401-412}
}
A number of mobile applications have emerged that allow users to locate one another. [...] Key Method These technologies include user interfaces for specifying rules and auditing disclosures, as well as machine learning techniques to refine user policies based on their feedback. We present evaluations of these technologies in the context of one laboratory study and three field studies.Expand
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