Understanding Mass Panic and Other Collective Responses to Threat and Disaster

@article{Mawson2005UnderstandingMP,
  title={Understanding Mass Panic and Other Collective Responses to Threat and Disaster},
  author={Anthony R Mawson},
  journal={Psychiatry},
  year={2005},
  volume={68},
  pages={113 - 95}
}
  • A. Mawson
  • Published 1 June 2005
  • Psychology
  • Psychiatry
Abstract While mass panic (and/or violence) and self-preservation are often assumed to be the natural response to physical danger and perceived entrapment, the literature indicates that expressions of mutual aid are common and often predominate, and collective flight may be so delayed that survival is threatened. In fact, the typical response to a variety of threats and disasters is not to flee but to seek the proximity of familiar persons and places; moreover, separation from attachment… 

Human collective reactions to threat.

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  • 2015
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Mawson’s valuable review (2005) adds sponse, dealt with in depth, the complex issues involved in collective behaviors, both positive and negcepts, drawn together in the framework of “social attachment” as the driver for such ative, need to be analyzed and understood.

Viewpoint: Terrorism and Dispelling the Myth of a Panic Prone Public

This discussion encompasses differing risk perceptions of terrorist threats and consequences of attacks, and how fear and anxiety interact with behavioural responses to amplify or attenuate perceptions that can be modified through risk communication undertaken by authorities.

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