Understanding Copyright Law in Online Creative Communities

@article{Fiesler2015UnderstandingCL,
  title={Understanding Copyright Law in Online Creative Communities},
  author={Casey Fiesler and Jessica L. Feuston and Amy Bruckman},
  journal={Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work \& Social Computing},
  year={2015}
}
Copyright law is increasingly relevant to everyday interactions online, from social media status updates to artists showcasing their work. This is especially true in creative spaces where rules about reuse and remix are notoriously gray. Based on a content analysis of public forum postings in eight different online communities featuring different media types (music, video, art, and writing), we found that copyright is a frequent topic of conversation and that much of this discourse stems from… 

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