Understanding Catchment‐Scale Forest Root Water Uptake Strategies Across the Continental United States Through Inverse Ecohydrological Modeling

@article{Knighton2020UnderstandingCF,
  title={Understanding Catchment‐Scale Forest Root Water Uptake Strategies Across the Continental United States Through Inverse Ecohydrological Modeling},
  author={James O. Knighton and Kanishka Aman Singh and Jaivime Evaristo},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2020},
  volume={47}
}
Trees influence the partitioning of water between catchment water yield and evapotranspiration through mediation of soil water via root water uptake (RWU). Recent research has estimated the depth of RWU for a variety of tree species at plot scales with measurements of stable isotopes in water and sap flux. Though informative, there are some challenges bridging the gap between plot‐ and catchment‐scale water fluxes. We estimated catchment‐scale tree RWU behavior for 139 forested catchments… 

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