Underestimating the unrepresented: Cognitive biases disadvantage pro se litigants in family law cases.

@article{Kroeper2020UnderestimatingTU,
  title={Underestimating the unrepresented: Cognitive biases disadvantage pro se litigants in family law cases.},
  author={Kathryn M. Kroeper and V. Quintanilla and Michael Frisby and Nedim Yel and Amy G. Applegate and Steven J. Sherman and Mary C Murphy},
  journal={Psychology, Public Policy and Law},
  year={2020},
  volume={26},
  pages={198-212}
}
  • Kathryn M. Kroeper, V. Quintanilla, +4 authors Mary C Murphy
  • Published 2020
  • Psychology
  • Psychology, Public Policy and Law
  • The majority of civil cases in the United States involve at least one pro se party—more often than not, at least 1 litigant is unrepresented by legal counsel. Despite efforts to provide pro se parties with information that decreases the procedural complexity of litigation, wide access to justice gaps persist between counseled and pro se litigants. We argue that, although helpful, information alone is not enough to close access-to-justice gaps, because the mere presence of counsel gives… CONTINUE READING

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