Under pressure: investigating the biology of plant infection by Magnaporthe oryzae

@article{Wilson2009UnderPI,
  title={Under pressure: investigating the biology of plant infection by Magnaporthe oryzae},
  author={Richard A. Wilson and N. Talbot},
  journal={Nature Reviews Microbiology},
  year={2009},
  volume={7},
  pages={185-195}
}
The filamentous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae causes rice blast, the most serious disease of cultivated rice. Cellular differentiation of M. oryzae forms an infection structure called the appressorium, which generates enormous cellular turgor that is sufficient to rupture the plant cuticle. Here, we show how functional genomics approaches are providing new insight into the genetic control of plant infection by M. oryzae. We also look ahead to the key questions that need to be addressed to provide a… Expand
Rise of a Cereal Killer: The Biology of Magnaporthe oryzae Biotrophic Growth.
TLDR
Recent advances in the understanding of the cell biology of M. oryzae biotrophic interaction and key molecular factors required for the disease establishment in rice cells are described. Expand
Investigating the cell biology of plant infection by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.
TLDR
Recent advances in understanding the cell biology of plant infection are reviewed and the remarkable ability of the rice blast fungus to invade plant tissue and manipulate the host plant using a battery of secreted effector proteins is reviewed. Expand
Investigating the biology of plant infection by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.
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This review describes recent progress in understanding how M. oryzae uses specialised cell called appressoria to bring about plant infection and the underlying biology of this developmental process, and how the fungus is then able to proliferate within rice tissue, deploying effector proteins to facilitate its spread. Expand
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The major outcome of this research project has been the identification of a new M. oryzae pathogenicity gene, TPC1 (Transcription factor for Polarity Control1), which was identified as a pathogenicicitydefective mutant M1422 generated by random insertional T-DNA mutagenesis. Expand
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It is argued that the infection process can be viewed as two discrete phases occurring in markedly different environments and requiring distinct biochemical pathways and morphogenetic regulation: outside the host cell, where the appressorium develops in a nutrient-free environment, and inside the hostcell, where filamentous growth occurs in a glucose-rich, nitrogen-poor environment, at least from the perspective of the fungus. Expand
Investigating the cell and developmental biology of plant infection by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.
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Live cell imaging approaches are applied to understanding the cell and developmental biology of rice blast disease by reviewing morphogenetic transitions of M. oryzae in the context of live cell imaging studies. Expand
The Biology of Invasive Growth by the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.
TLDR
This introductory chapter describes the life cycle of Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease, and the signaling pathways involved in perception of surface signals are described and the mechanism by which appressoria function is also introduced. Expand
Growth in rice cells requires de novo purine biosynthesis by the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae
TLDR
It is reported that a purine-requiring mutant of M. oryzae could develop functional appressoria, penetrate host cells and undergo the morphogenetic transition to elaborate bulbous invasive hyphae from primary hyphAE, but further in planta growth was aborted. Expand
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