Unconventional lift-generating mechanisms in free-flying butterflies

@article{Srygley2002UnconventionalLM,
  title={Unconventional lift-generating mechanisms in free-flying butterflies},
  author={Robert B Srygley and A. L. R. Thomas},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2002},
  volume={420},
  pages={660-664}
}
Flying insects generate forces that are too large to be accounted for by conventional steady-state aerodynamics. [...] Key Result There seems to be no one ‘key’ to insect flight, instead insects rely on a wide array of aerodynamic mechanisms to take off, manoeuvre, maintain steady flight, and for landing.Expand
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