Unconscious cerebral initiative and the role of conscious will in voluntary action

@article{Libet1985UnconsciousCI,
  title={Unconscious cerebral initiative and the role of conscious will in voluntary action},
  author={Benjamin Libet},
  journal={Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  year={1985},
  volume={8},
  pages={529-539}
}
  • B. Libet
  • Published 1 December 1985
  • Psychology
  • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
Voluntary acts are preceded by electrophysiological "readiness potentials" (RPs). With spontaneous acts involving no preplanning, the main negative RP shift begins at about -550 ms. Such RP's were used to indicate the minimum onset times for the cerebral activity that precedes a fully endogenous voluntary act. The time of conscious intention to act was obtained from the subject's recall of the spatial clock position of a revolving spot at the time of his initial awareness of intending or… 

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