Unchanged cardiac angiotensin II levels accompany losartan-sensitive cardiac injury due to nitric oxide synthase inhibition.

Abstract

Chronic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition results in hypertension and myocardial injury. In a rapid and severe model of chronic NOS inhibition, we determined the role of angiotensin II in these effects by using angiotensin II receptor blockade and by measuring cardiac angiotensin II concentrations before and during development of cardiac damage. Rats received either no treatment, the NOS inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 500 mg/l), the angiotensin AT(1) receptor antagonist losartan (400 mg/kg chow), or L-NNA plus losartan for 21 days. In the second protocol, five groups of rats received L-NNA (500 mg/l) for 0, 4, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. L-NNA increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) (227+/-8 versus 143+/-6 mm Hg; P<0.01), heart weight index (0.44+/-0.02 versus 0.32+/-0.01; P<0.01) and induced coronary vasculitis and myocardial necrosis. Co-treatment with losartan prevented all changes. L-NNA during 4 days decreased cardiac angiotensin II (23+/-4 versus 61+/-15 fmol/g; P<0.05). Although after 7 days, fresh infarcts and after 14 days organized infarcts were present, cardiac angiotensin II was only slightly increased after 21 days (100+/-10 fmol/g; P<0.05). In conclusion, losartan-sensitive cardiac damage due to chronic NOS inhibition is not associated with primary increase of cardiac angiotensin II, suggesting that chronic NOS inhibition increases cardiac sensitivity for angiotensin II.

Cite this paper

@article{Verhagen2000UnchangedCA, title={Unchanged cardiac angiotensin II levels accompany losartan-sensitive cardiac injury due to nitric oxide synthase inhibition.}, author={Ad F. T. M. Verhagen and J Hohbach and Jaap A. Joles and Branko Braam and Prof. Dr. H. H. Boer and Hein A. Koomans and H. J. Gr{\"{o}ne}, journal={European journal of pharmacology}, year={2000}, volume={400 2-3}, pages={239-47} }