Ultraviolet vision and mate choice in zebra finches

@article{Bennett1996UltravioletVA,
  title={Ultraviolet vision and mate choice in zebra finches},
  author={Andrew T. D. Bennett and Innes C. Cuthill and Julian C. Partridge and E. J. Maier},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1996},
  volume={380},
  pages={433-435}
}
SEXUAL selection is one of the most actively studied areas of evolutionary biology1–3, and ever since Darwin1 birds have been probably the most popular taxon for testing the predictions about colour variation. Humans have been used to assess 'colour', an approach which may be flawed4,5 as many birds see in the ultraviolet (to which humans are blind), and have at least four spectral classes of retinal cone cells (humans have only three). Here we report experiments on zebra finches which test the… Expand
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References

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It is argued that the error in this assumption that birds see color patterns as humans do may well be a major reason that support for various evolutionary hypotheses involving color is an area of controversy, and suggests methods for overcoming the shortcomings of existing studies. Expand
Ultraviolet vision in birds: What is its function?
TLDR
The evidence for UV vision in birds is reviewed, the special properties of UV light are discussed, and the main hypotheses are that UV vision functions: in orientation, in foraging and in signaling. Expand
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TLDR
The rapidly accumulating data on the evolutionary relationships of opsins continue to suggest that within specific opsin lineages the absorption maxima of the retinal-based visual pigments lie within about 40 nm of each other, but some UV pigments may provide the first exception to this generalization. Expand
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This is the first experiment to indicate that symmetrically manipulated males gain reproductive advantages in controlled laboratory conditions and further supports recent theories indicating the evolutionary importance of symmetry in signalling-trait design. Expand
Female zebra finches prefer males with symmetric chest plumage
  • J. Swaddle, I. Cuthill
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
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TLDR
This work manipulates an existing secondary sexual plumage trait, one that does not influence flight performance, within the boundaries of natural asymmetry, and demonstrates that female zebra finches choose to display more and for longer in front of males with asymmetric, chest plumage. Expand
Influence of colour-banding on the conspecific preferences of zebra finches
Abstract Male and female zebra finches are affected by the colour of plastic leg bands worn by opposite-sex conspecifics. They find certain colours more attractive, and others less attractive, thanExpand
Preference for symmetric males by female zebra finches
TLDR
It is shown here that female zebra finches choose symmetrically leg-banded males over asymmetrically banded ones, demonstrating unequivocally that females use symmetry as a criterion in partner preference, although whether the symmetry preference is specific to secondary sexual characters is unknown. Expand
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