Ultraviolet radiation, toxic chemicals and amphibian population declines

@inproceedings{Blaustein2003UltravioletRT,
  title={Ultraviolet radiation, toxic chemicals and amphibian population declines},
  author={Andrew R. Blaustein and John M. Romansic and Joseph Michael Kiesecker and A. C. Hatch},
  year={2003}
}
As part of an overall 'biodiversity crisis', many amphibian populations are in decline throughout the world. Numerous factors have contributed to these declines, including habitat destruction, pathogens, increasing ultraviolet (UV) radiation, introduced non-native species and contaminants. In this paper we review the contribution of increasing UV radiation and environmental contamination to the global decline of amphibian populations. Both UV radiation and environmental contaminants can affect… CONTINUE READING

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