Corpus ID: 18149309

Ultrasound-triggered, flight-gated evasive maneuvers in the praying mantis Parasphendale agrionina. I. Free flight.

@article{Yager1990UltrasoundtriggeredFE,
  title={Ultrasound-triggered, flight-gated evasive maneuvers in the praying mantis Parasphendale agrionina. I. Free flight.},
  author={D. Yager and M. L. May and M. Fenton},
  journal={The Journal of experimental biology},
  year={1990},
  volume={152},
  pages={
          17-39
        }
}
Free-flying male praying mantises Parasphendale agrionina (Gerst.) perform evasive maneuvers when stimulated by ultrasound and when attacked by hunting, echolocating bats. They do not, however, respond in any way when standing on a substratum. The maneuvers are graded in intensity with distance from the sound source: far from the source they are simple turns, whereas close to the source they are steep diving turns or spirals. The maneuvers are made under power, and the male's velocity doubles… Expand
Ultrasound-triggered, flight-gated evasive maneuvers in the praying mantis Parasphendale agrionina. II. Tethered flight.
TLDR
Several components of the in-flight evasive behavior resemble defensive displays on the ground, and it is suggested that this mantis has responded to predation pressure from bats with both flight-derived maneuvers and an aerial deimatic display. Expand
Free-flight encounters between praying mantids (Parasphendale agrionina) and bats (Eptesicus fuscus)
TLDR
It is suggested that echolocation attack sequences containing very rapid transitions could circumvent mantis/insect auditory defenses and cercal-mediated evasive behaviors triggered by bat-generated wind could be beneficial as a backup/secondary system. Expand
Behavioral responses of big brown bats to dives by praying mantises
TLDR
It is suggested that although the mantis dive can be effective in evading the bat, it does not always deter the bat from continuing pursuit and, given enough altitude, the bat can potentially capture diving prey using the same flight strategy it employs to intercept prey in level flight. Expand
Timing of praying mantis evasive responses during simulated bat attack sequences
TLDR
It is suggested that a bat gradually increasing its PRR could `tip off' the mantis, enabling it to escape, and mantids as well as other insects could benefit from having a back-up defense response to offset any advantage the bat gains by rapidly switching from low to high PRRs. Expand
Behavioral response to ultrasound by the tiger beetle Cicindela marutha dow combines aerodynamic changes and sound production.
TLDR
Physiological audiograms from the auditory afferents show substantially greater sensitivity and sharper tuning than the behavioral response, which suggests that tiger beetles may use their hearing in other contexts as well as during flight. Expand
Predator counteradaptations: stealth echolocation overcomes insect sonar-jamming and evasive-manoeuvring defences
TLDR
It is concluded that stealth echolocation is an evolutionary counteradaptation to insect defences because there is no known benefit for C. townsendii to use low-amplitude calls outside of predator–prey interactions, and such calls come with considerable cost in reduced prey detection distances. Expand
Ultrasound avoidance behaviour in the bushcricket Tettigonia viridissima (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).
TLDR
The responses of female Tettigonia viridissima to simulated bat echolocation calls were examined during tethered flight, and it is estimated that the diving response occurs at approximately the sound amplitude at which many aerial-hawking bats first receive echoes from the insect. Expand
Wind generated by an attacking bat: anemometric measurements and detection by the praying mantis cercal system
TLDR
The wind-sensitive cercal system of a tethered praying mantis may also mediate insect aerial bat-avoidance responses triggered by wind generated by the approaching bat, and the velocity of the bat-generated wind consistently peaks early with a high acceleration component. Expand
Broad versus narrow auditory tuning and corresponding bat‐evasive flight behaviour in praying mantids
TLDR
This study describes a small subset of species that differs in three major respects from the majority of mantis species: their auditory tuning is 1.5–2 times broader, and the behavioural response of the broadly tuned (BT) species includes 10–50 times more flight cessations and can be far less stereotyped than that of narrowly tuned (NT) species. Expand
Wind-evoked evasive responses in flying cockroaches
TLDR
Whether flying cockroaches also turn away from air displacement like that produced by an approaching flying predator; and if so, whether the cerci and dorsal giant interneurons mediate this response, and whether this response is useful in escaping from predators. Expand
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References

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Ultrasound-triggered, flight-gated evasive maneuvers in the praying mantis Parasphendale agrionina. II. Tethered flight.
TLDR
Several components of the in-flight evasive behavior resemble defensive displays on the ground, and it is suggested that this mantis has responded to predation pressure from bats with both flight-derived maneuvers and an aerial deimatic display. Expand
The behaviour of flying green lacewings, Chrysopa carnea, in the presence of ultrasound
TLDR
This flight cessation behaviour provides a mechanism whereby green lacewings can avoid predation by bats, and is compared with similar responses in noctuid moths. Expand
THE AUDITORY BEHAVIOUR OF FLYING LOCUSTS
TLDR
The auditory behaviour of tethered locusts flying in a wind tunnel was investigated under controlled acoustic conditions and this steering behaviour is thought to be part of an early-warning system adapted to the acoustic detection of echolocating predators. Expand
Turning tendency of moths exposed to ultrasound while in stationary flight
TLDR
The effects of unilateral tympanotomy, sex, species, and other factors are examined in relation to turning-away behaviour and other responses shown by free-flying moths in response to bats and artificial sound sources. Expand
Steering responses of flying crickets to sound and ultrasound: Mate attraction and predator avoidance.
  • A. Moiseff, G. Pollack, R. Hoy
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1978
TLDR
This investigation of steering responses of tethered, flying adult female crickets to acoustic stimulation suggests that crickets, like some other nocturnal flying insects, can evade bats by acoustic detection. Expand
Ultrasound-induced yaw movements in the flying Australian field cricket (Teleogryllus oceanicus).
TLDR
An ultrasonic stimulus induced negative phonotactic steering in the yaw axis of tethered, flying Australian field crickets, revealing that this behavior is more complex than a simple reflex. Expand
The behaviour of free flying moths in the presence of artificial ultrasonic pulses
Abstract The avoidance reactions of moths to a stationary source of ultrasonic pulses were observed and photographically recorded under field conditions. High-intensity ultrasound caused responsesExpand
Defensive behaviour in Ghanaian praying mantids
TLDR
The defensive behaviour of 25 species of praying mantids from Ghana is described and a curious “boxing display” is described, used as taxonomic evidence for the close relationship of these three genera. Expand
The echolocation of flying insects by bats
TLDR
Although bats sometimes detect insect prey by passive listening to sounds emanating from the insects themselves, these experiments appear to establish conclusively that small and relatively silent insects are often detected by echolocation. Expand
Aspects of the noctuid tympanic nerve response having significance in the avoidance of bats
TLDR
Analysis of the afferent response from the tympanic organ of noctuid moths shows that intensity differences of ultrasonic pulses are encoded by the spike discharge of the acoustic cells in four different ways; it is argued that criteria 2 and 3 would be able to provide monaural information relative to threshold intensity, while criteria 1 and 4 would be unambiguous only as an interaural difference in a binaural moth. Expand
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