Ultra-High Foraging Rates of Harbor Porpoises Make Them Vulnerable to Anthropogenic Disturbance

@article{Wisniewska2016UltraHighFR,
  title={Ultra-High Foraging Rates of Harbor Porpoises Make Them Vulnerable to Anthropogenic Disturbance},
  author={Danuta Maria Wisniewska and Mark Johnson and Jonas Teilmann and Laia Rojano-Do{\~n}ate and Jeanne M Shearer and Signe Sveegaard and Lee A. Miller and Ursula Siebert and Peter Teglberg Madsen},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2016},
  volume={26},
  pages={1441-1446}
}

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