Ubiquity symposium 'What is computation?': Computation and Fundamental Physics

@article{Bacon2010UbiquityS,
  title={Ubiquity symposium 'What is computation?': Computation and Fundamental Physics},
  author={Dave Bacon},
  journal={Ubiquity},
  year={2010},
  volume={2010},
  pages={4}
}
  • D. Bacon
  • Published 1 December 2010
  • Physics
  • Ubiquity
In this seventh article in the ACM Ubiquity symposium, What is Computation?, Dave Bacon of University of Washington explains why he thinks discussing the question is as important as thinking about what it means to be self-aware. —Editor 
1 Citations
What is a Computer? A Survey
TLDR
A critical survey of some attempts to define ‘computer’, beginning with some informal ones, then critically evaluating those of three philosophers (J.R. Searle, P. Hayes, and G. Piccinini), and concluding with an examination of whether the brain and the universe are computers.

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