Ubiquity and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in water columns and sediments of the ocean.

@article{Francis2005UbiquityAD,
  title={Ubiquity and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in water columns and sediments of the ocean.},
  author={Christopher A. Francis and Kathryn J Roberts and J. Michael Beman and Alyson E. Santoro and Brian B Oakley},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2005},
  volume={102 41},
  pages={
          14683-8
        }
}
  • C. Francis, K. Roberts, +2 authors B. Oakley
  • Published 11 October 2005
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Nitrification, the microbial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate, occurs in a wide variety of environments and plays a central role in the global nitrogen cycle. Catalyzed by the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, the ability to oxidize ammonia was previously thought to be restricted to a few groups within the beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria. However, recent metagenomic studies have revealed the existence of unique ammonia monooxygenase alpha-subunit (amoA) genes derived from uncultivated… Expand
Global Biodiversity of Aquatic Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea is Partitioned by Habitat
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Over 8000 amoA sequences from the literature and public databases are examined in an effort to understand the ecological factors influencing the distribution and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), with a particular focus on sequences from aquatic habitats. Expand
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The functional cohort of AOB, ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and the nitrite-oxIDizing prokaryotes will persist as important model organisms for linking the process of nitrification to microbial diversity and biogeography. Expand
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The abundance and diversity of amoA gene, a gene putatively encoding ammonia monooxygenase subunit A, was evaluated in oxic lake water and anoxic sediments from two adjacent sites of Qinghai Lake, China, suggesting that AOA in the sediments may be native and metabolically active. Expand
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TLDR
Direct quantification of ammonia oxidation rates by 15N labeling, and AOA and AOB abundances by quantitative PCR analysis of ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) genes, in the Gulf of California represent compelling evidence for an archaeal role in oceanic nitrification. Expand
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TLDR
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Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea Dominate Ammonia-Oxidizing Communities within Alkaline Cave Sediments
TLDR
The results showed that AOA outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) by up to four orders of magnitude in cave sediments, and data suggest that despite the alkaline conditions within the cave, the low NH3 concentrations measured continue to favor growth of AOA over AOB populations. Expand
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  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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