UV climatology at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, based on version 2 data of the National Science Foundation's Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring Network

@article{Bernhard2006UVCA,
  title={UV climatology at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, based on version 2 data of the National Science Foundation's Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring Network},
  author={Germar H. Bernhard and Charles Rocky Booth and James C. Ehramjian and Sylvia E. Nichol},
  journal={Journal of Geophysical Research},
  year={2006},
  volume={111}
}
[1] Spectral ultraviolet (UV) and visible irradiance has been measured near McMurdo Station, Antarctica, between 1989 and 2004 with a SUV-100 spectroradiometer. The instrument is part of the U.S. National Science Foundation's UV Monitoring Network. Here we present a UV climatology for McMurdo based on the recently produced “version 2” data edition. Compared to the previously published “version 0” data set, version 2 data differ by −5 to 12% in the UV, depending on wavelength, solar zenith angle… 

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