• Corpus ID: 17432820

USE OF COPPER PROTEINATES AND COPPER LYSINE IN ANIMAL FEEDING PROGRAMS

@inproceedings{Hemken1997USEOC,
  title={USE OF COPPER PROTEINATES AND COPPER LYSINE IN ANIMAL FEEDING PROGRAMS},
  author={Roger W. Hemken},
  year={1997}
}
Copper (Cu) deficiencies are the result of either very low levels of copper in feedstuffs or because of other factors which affect the bioavailability of dietary copper. Baker and Ammerman (1995), in reviewing dietary factors which influence the bioavailability of copper, include metal-ion interactions, chelating agents, and compounds such as ascorbic acid, sugars and starches, and some amino acids as factors influencing copper. Frequently, nutritionists add high levels (30 to 40 ppm) of copper… 
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Relative Bioavailability of Trace Minerals in Production Animal Nutrition: A Review

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