U.S. Dietary Guidelines: An Evidence-Free Zone

@article{Nissen2016USDG,
  title={U.S. Dietary Guidelines: An Evidence-Free Zone},
  author={Steven E Nissen},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2016},
  volume={164},
  pages={558-559}
}
  • S. Nissen
  • Published 19 April 2016
  • Medicine
  • Annals of Internal Medicine
On 7 January 2016, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Agriculture released the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 20152020 (1). The preliminary report (released in February 2015) had generated considerable media attention by reversing decades of dogma with the statement that cholesterol is not a nutrient of concern for overconsumption. Incredibly, in the final 2015 report, this statement has been removed, instead suggesting that individuals should eat as little… Expand
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