U-Th dating of carbonate crusts reveals Neandertal origin of Iberian cave art

@article{Hoffmann2018UThDO,
  title={U-Th dating of carbonate crusts reveals Neandertal origin of Iberian cave art},
  author={Dirk L. Hoffmann and Christopher D. Standish and Marcos Garc{\'i}a-Diez and P. B. Pettitt and James A. Milton and Jo{\~a}o Zilh{\~a}o and J J Alcolea-Gonz{\'a}lez and Pedro Cantalejo-Duarte and H. Collado and R. de Balb{\'i}n and Michel Lorblanchet and Jos{\'e} Ramos-Mu{\~n}oz and G-Ch Weniger and A. W. G. Pike},
  journal={Science},
  year={2018},
  volume={359},
  pages={912 - 915}
}
Neandertal cave art It has been suggested that Neandertals, as well as modern humans, may have painted caves. Hoffmann et al. used uranium-thorium dating of carbonate crusts to show that cave paintings from three different sites in Spain must be older than 64,000 years. These paintings are the oldest dated cave paintings in the world. Importantly, they predate the arrival of modern humans in Europe by at least 20,000 years, which suggests that they must be of Neandertal origin. The cave art… 

Symbolic use of marine shells and mineral pigments by Iberian Neandertals 115,000 years ago

U-series dating of archaeological deposits of Cueva de los Aviones provides evidence for Neandertal symbolism 115,000 years ago, and it is possible that the roots of symbolic material culture may be found among the common ancestor of Ne andertals and modern humans, more than half-a-million years ago.

The symbolic role of the underground world among Middle Paleolithic Neanderthals

The hypothesis that Neanderthals symbolically used these paintings and the large stalagmitic dome harboring them over an extended time span is strengthened.

Palaeolithic cave art in Borneo

It is now evident that a major Palaeolithic cave art province existed in the eastern extremity of continental Eurasia and in adjacent Wallacea from at least 40 ka until the Last Glacial Maximum, which has implications for understanding how early rock art traditions emerged, developed and spread in Pleistocene Southeast Asia and further afield.

Late Palaeolithic cave art and permafrost in the Southern Ural

Detailed 230Th-U dating of calcite flowstone underlying and overgrowing the paintings at 22 sites in three halls of the Shulgan-Tash cave found that the youngest age for the underlying calcite is 36.4 ± 0.1 ka, and the oldest overlying calcite (constraining the minimum age of the cave art) is 14.5‬±‬0.04‬ka.

230Th dating of flowstone from Ignatievskaya Cave, Russia: Age constraints of rock art and paleoclimate inferences

This study constrain the age of parietal art in the cave by 230Th dating of flowstone that brackets the paintings, and shows that the middle Holocene age of art in Ignatievskaya cave is consistent with its Upper Paleolithic antiquity.

A Paleolithic bird figurine from the Lingjing site, Henan, China

The carving, which predates previously known comparable instances from this region by 8,500 years, demonstrates that three-dimensional avian representations were part of East Asian Late Pleistocene cultural repertoires and identifies technological and stylistic peculiarities distinguishing this newly discovered art tradition from previous and contemporary examples found in Western Europe and Siberia.

Last Interglacial Iberian Neandertals as fisher-hunter-gatherers

Evidence is presented that, in Atlantic Iberia's coastal settings, Middle Paleolithic Neanderthals exploited marine resources at a scale on par with the modern human–associated Middle Stone Age of southern Africa, and shell middens rich in the remains of mollusks, crabs, and fish, as well as terrestrial food items are revealed at the Figueira Brava site.

Art in European caves

...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 50 REFERENCES

U-Series Dating of Paleolithic Art in 11 Caves in Spain

Dating of calcite crusts overlying art in Spanish caves shows that painting began more than 40,000 years ago, revealing either that cave art was a part of the cultural repertoire of the first anatomically modern humans in Europe or that perhaps Neandertals also engaged in painting caves.

Pleistocene cave art from Sulawesi, Indonesia

It can now be demonstrated that humans were producing rock art by ∼40 kyr ago at opposite ends of the Pleistocene Eurasian world.

Symbolic use of marine shells and mineral pigments by Iberian Neandertals 115,000 years ago

U-series dating of archaeological deposits of Cueva de los Aviones provides evidence for Neandertal symbolism 115,000 years ago, and it is possible that the roots of symbolic material culture may be found among the common ancestor of Ne andertals and modern humans, more than half-a-million years ago.

Early Neanderthal constructions deep in Bruniquel Cave in southwestern France.

The dating of annular constructions made of broken stalagmites found deep in Bruniquel Cave in southwest France gives a reliable and replicated age of 176.5 thousand years (±2.1 thousand years), making these edifices among the oldest known well-dated constructionsmade by humans.

The chronology of hand stencils in European Palaeolithic rock art: implications of new U-series results from El Castillo Cave (Cantabria, Spain).

Application of U-series dating to calcite accretions has established a minimum age of 37,290 years for underlying red hand stencils, implying execution in the earlier part of the Aurignacian if not beforehand at El Castillo Cave.

Symbolic use of marine shells and mineral pigments by Iberian Neandertals

The Iberian finds show that European Neandertals were no different from coeval Africans in this regard, countering genetic/cognitive explanations for the emergence of symbolism and strengthening demographic/social ones.

The Chronology and Taphonomy of the Earliest Aurignacian and Its Implications for the Understanding of Neandertal Extinction

The view that the Châtelperronian is the acculturation of late Neandertals brought about by contact with nearby moderns assumes an age of ca. 40,000 years ago for the earliest Aurignacian. However,

Dating European Palaeolithic Cave Art: Progress, Prospects, Problems

Over the last decade several dozen direct dates on cave art pigments or associated materials have supplemented more traditional style-based attempts to establish a chronological (and developmental)