Tyrannosaurs suffered from gout

@article{Rothschild1997TyrannosaursSF,
  title={Tyrannosaurs suffered from gout},
  author={Bruce M. Rothschild and Darren H. Tanke and K. Carpenter},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1997},
  volume={387},
  pages={357-357}
}
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