Type V Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A New Form of Brittle Bone Disease

@article{Glorieux2000TypeVO,
  title={Type V Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A New Form of Brittle Bone Disease},
  author={Francis H Glorieux and Frank Rauch and Horacio Plotkin and Leanne M. Ward and Rose Travers and Peter J. Roughley and L Lalic and D. Glorieux and François Fassier and Nicholas Bishop},
  journal={Journal of Bone and Mineral Research},
  year={2000},
  volume={15}
}
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is commonly subdivided into four clinical types. Among these, OI type IV clearly represents a heterogeneous group of disorders. Here we describe 7 OI patients (3 girls), who would typically be classified as having OI type IV but who can be distinguished from other type IV patients. We propose to call this disease entity OI type V. These children had a history of moderate to severe increased fragility of long bones and vertebral bodies. Four patients had experienced… Expand
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