Twombly and Iqbal at the State Level

@article{Michalski2017TwomblyAI,
  title={Twombly and Iqbal at the State Level},
  author={Roger Michalski and Abby K. Wood},
  journal={Litigation \& Procedure eJournal},
  year={2017}
}
This article contributes to the empirical literature on pleading standards by studying the effect of Twombly and Iqbal at the state level. States account for the majority of civil litigation, yet they are understudied doctrinally and empirically. When we consider pleading at the state level, we can leverage differences across space and time in a way that is impossible with studies of federal courts. Using an array of principled empirical approaches on the best available data, we find no… 
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