Two-year Experience with Buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone) for Maintenance Treatment of Opioid Dependence Within a Private Practice Setting

@article{Finch2007TwoyearEW,
  title={Two-year Experience with Buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone) for Maintenance Treatment of Opioid Dependence Within a Private Practice Setting},
  author={J. William Finch and Jonathan B. Kamien and Leslie Amass},
  journal={Journal of Addiction Medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={1},
  pages={104-110}
}
Office-based buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone) treatment in the United States has significantly improved access to safe and effective opioid-dependence therapy. Little data from physicians' experiences prescribing Suboxone in private offices have been available. This retrospective chart review describes a family practitioner's first 2 years of clinical experience prescribing Suboxone for opioid dependence to 71 patients in a private office. After directly observed rapid office dose induction… 

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