Two strategies for correcting refractive errors in school students in Tanzania: randomised comparison, with implications for screening programmes

@article{Wedner2008TwoSF,
  title={Two strategies for correcting refractive errors in school students in Tanzania: randomised comparison, with implications for screening programmes},
  author={Susanne H. Wedner and Honorati Masanja and R Bowman and Jim Todd and R Bowman and C Gilbert},
  journal={British Journal of Ophthalmology},
  year={2008},
  volume={92},
  pages={19 - 24}
}
Purpose: To compare whether free spectacles or only a prescription for spectacles influences wearing rates among Tanzanian students with un/undercorrected refractive error (RE). Methods: Design: Cluster randomised trial. Setting: 37 secondary schools in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Participants: Distance visual acuity was measured in 6,904 year-1 students (90.2% response rate; median age 14 years; range 11–25 years) using a Snellen E-chart. 135 had RE requiring correction. Interventions: Schools… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
Some programs do the screening, refraction testing and provision of spectacles to children entirely in the school setting ("School Model"). One strength of such programs is that most… Expand
ConditionsRefractive Error
InterventionOther
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Spectacle Coverage among Urban Schoolchildren with Refractive Error Provided Subsidized Spectacles in North India.
  • Vivek Gupta, R. Saxena, +4 authors V. Menon
  • Medicine
  • Optometry and vision science : official publication of the American Academy of Optometry
  • 2019
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