Two decades with dimorphic Chloride Intracellular Channels (CLICs)

@article{Singh2010TwoDW,
  title={Two decades with dimorphic Chloride Intracellular Channels (CLICs)},
  author={Harpreet Singh},
  journal={FEBS Letters},
  year={2010},
  volume={584}
}
Plasma membrane channels have been extensively studied, and their physiological roles are well established. In contrast, relatively little information is available about intracellular ion channels. Chloride Intracellular Channel (CLICs) proteins are a novel class of putative intracellular ion channels. They are widely expressed in different intracellular compartments, and possess distinct properties such as the presence of a single transmembrane domain, and a dimorphic existence as either a… 
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TLDR
Fitting the data to symmetric oligomer models of the CLIC1 transmembrane form indicates that the structure is large and most consistent with a model comprising approximately six to eight subunits.
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Emerging evidence points to a role of CLIC proteins in actin dynamics and membrane trafficking and the lessons learned from gene-targeting studies are discussed.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Chapter 9 Lifting the Fog over Mitochondrial Chloride Channels
The current through mitochondrial chloride channels was first described in 1987. Subsequently, several types of ion channels permeable to chloride and other anions were found in the mitochondria of
Lifting the Fog over Mitochondrial Chloride Channels
The current through mitochondrial chloride channels was first described in 1987. Subsequently, several types of ion channels permeable to chloride and other anions were found in the mitochondria of
Subconductance states of mitochondrial chloride channels: implication for functionally‐coupled tetramers
TLDR
This work discusses the putative connection of channel activity from native mitochondria with the recombinant CLIC channels, and suggests that the observed channels work as four functionally coupled subunits with synchronized gating.
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