Two cooperatively social populations of the theridiid spider Anelosimus studiosus in a temperate region

@article{Furey1998TwoCS,
  title={Two cooperatively social populations of the theridiid spider
 Anelosimus studiosus
 in a temperate region},
  author={Robert E. Furey},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1998},
  volume={55},
  pages={727-735}
}
  • R. Furey
  • Published 1 March 1998
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
Social spiders are typically found only in the tropics. In laboratory tests and field observations, adult female A. studiosus in two populations in Tennessee, U.S.A., a temperate region, showed inter-attraction (grouping behaviour caused by the presence of conspecifics), greater tolerance towards conspecifics, and cooperation during prey capture and brood care. These are the three classical conditions considered typical of social spiders. The populations also had female-biased sex ratios and… 
Behavioural syndromes and their fitness consequences in a socially polymorphic spider, Anelosimus studiosus
TLDR
The behaviour of individuals in staged, mixed-phenotype feeding pairs indicated that social individuals may suffer fitness consequences in polymorphic populations, and results suggest linkage or pleiotropy between social behaviour and these traits.
INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE SOCIAL SPIDER ANELOSIMUS STUDIOSUS (ARANEAE, THERIDIIDAE) AND FOREIGN SPIDERS THAT FREQUENT ITS NESTS
TLDR
Field census results show that a close correspondence exists between the rate of loss of A. studious nests over time and the association rate of anyphaenids and agelenids at particular sites: these two families were the prominent predators on A. studiosus in laboratory trials.
The Effect of Temperature on the Development Rate of Anelosimus Studiosus
TLDR
This study examines the effect that temperature has on the development rate of A. studiosus juveniles, under the hypothesis that longer development time leads to a greater probability of a single mom dying before her offspring reach independence.
EVIDENCE OF KIN-SPECIFIC COMMUNICATION IN A TEMPERATE, SUBSOCIAL SPIDER ANELOSIMUS STUDIOSUS (ARANEAE, THERIDIIDAE)
TLDR
A degree of kin-specific communication between mother and offspring is suggested and that the communication may be mediated through silk draglines, which could be important in understanding group cohesion and how kin selection might work to create social networks within typically asocial taxa.
The Evolution of Sociality in Spiders
TLDR
This chapter discusses the occurrence of group living in spiders and illustrates that, as this terminology is also somewhat unwieldy, for convenience it revert to the commonly used shorthand designations of social and subsocial, for nonterritorial permanent‐social and territorial periodic‐social, respectively.
Phenotypic variation in the social behaviour of the spider Anelosimus studiosus along a latitudinal gradient
TLDR
Interaction trials showed that communication and physical contact underlie the two social structures of the spider Anelosimus studiosus, and Habitat transplants suggested that the behaviour underlying social structure is not plastic in this system, and breeding experiments eliminated a cryptic species alternative.
Natal dispersal patterns of a subsocial spider Anelosimus cf. jucundus (Theridiidae)
TLDR
It is found that most spiders initially dispersed less than 5 m from their natal nests, consistent with the hypothesis that natal dispersal results from resource competition within the natal nest, rather than inbreeding avoidance in competition for mates.
Madagascar: an unexpected hotspot of social Anelosimus spider diversity (Araneae: Theridiidae)
TLDR
The phylogenetic analysis supports the monophyly of the Madagascar group and places it as sister to a clade containing the eximius lineage from the Americas, and a pair of undescribed Tanzanian species.
Altitudinal Patterns of Spider Sociality and the Biology of a New Midelevation Social Anelosimus Species in Ecuador
TLDR
It is suggested that the absence of subsocial Anelosimus species in the lowland rain forest may be due to an increased probability of maternal death in this habitat due to greater predation and/or precipitation, while absence of a sufficient supply of large insects at high elevations or latitudes may restrict social species to low‐ to midelevation tropical moist forests.
Subsocial behaviour and brood adoption in mixed-species colonies of two theridiid spiders
TLDR
Social interactions in newly discovered mixed-species colonies of theridiid spiders on Bali, Indonesia are examined to test the degree of intra- and interspecific tolerance, aggression and cooperation through behavioural experiments and examine the potential for adoption of foreign brood.
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