Two-Year Costs and Quality in the Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative.

@article{Dale2016TwoYearCA,
  title={Two-Year Costs and Quality in the Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative.},
  author={Stacy Berg Dale and Arkadipta Ghosh and Deborah Peikes and Timothy J. Day and Frank B Yoon and Erin Fries Taylor and Kaylyn E Swankoski and Ann S. O'Malley and Patrick H. Conway and Rahul Rajkumar and Matthew J. Press and Laura L. Sessums and Randall S. Brown},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2016},
  volume={374 24},
  pages={
          2345-56
        }
}
BACKGROUND The 4-year, multipayer Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative was started in October 2012 to determine whether several forms of support would produce changes in care delivery that would improve the quality and reduce the costs of care at 497 primary care practices in seven regions across the United States. Support included the provision of care-management fees, the opportunity to earn shared savings, and the provision of data feedback and learning support. METHODS We tracked changes… Expand
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