Two Treatises of Government.

@article{Hall1966TwoTO,
  title={Two Treatises of Government.},
  author={Roland Hall and John Locke and Peter Laslett},
  journal={The Philosophical Quarterly},
  year={1966},
  volume={16},
  pages={365}
}
All these premises having, as I think, been clearly made out, it is impossible that the rulers now on earth should make any benefit, or derive any the least shadow of authority from that, which is held to be the fountain of all power, Adam's private dominion and paternal jurisdiction; so that he that will not give just occasion to think that all government in the world is the product only of force and violence, and that men live together by no other rules but that of beasts, where the strongest… Expand
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It is impossible of right, that men should do so, because all men being born under government