Two Phonological Innovations in Ritwan

@article{Berman1982TwoPI,
  title={Two Phonological Innovations in Ritwan},
  author={Howard R. Berman},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1982},
  volume={48},
  pages={412 - 420}
}
  • H. Berman
  • Published 1 October 1982
  • Linguistics
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
0. The Algonquian-Ritwan language family consists of the Algonquian languages, spoken over a large portion of eastern North America from the Great Plains to the Atlantic coast, and the Ritwan languages, Wiyot and Yurok, two small languages spoken in adjacent territory in northwest California. Given such a distribution one might expect that Wiyot and Yurok form a genetic subgroup, but the evidence presented so far is inconclusive (Haas 1966).1 In this article I describe two phonological… 
One Case of Contrast Evolution in the Yurok Vowel System1
This paper examines a case of contrast evolution in Yurok, an Algic language. Former *e has split into two vowels, e and a, due to phonetically conditioned vowel lowering which was rendered opaque by
The Rise and Fall of l Sandhi in California Algic
The two Algic languages of California, Wiyot and Yurok, have comparable external sandhi patterns whereby initial h surfaces as l after certain preverbs. We argue that h ⇒ l sandhi in each language
The Phonology of Yurok Glottalized Sonorants: Segmental Fission under Syllabification1
  • J. Blevins
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 2003
Yurok, an endangered Algic language of northwest California, has a series of glottalized sonorants which contrast with plain nonglottalized sonorants. Glottalized sonorants have interesting
Proto-Algic II: Verbs
  • P. Proulx
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1985
0. Introduction. In a recent article (Proulx 1984b) I described the phonological system of Proto-Algic (Algonquian-Wiyot-Yurok) in some detail and briefly discussed the methodological questions that
Proto-Algonquian-Ritwan Verbal Roots
  • Howard Berman
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1984
0. Introduction. In this article I present a list of the Proto-AlgonquianRitwan verbs arranged according to the shapes of their roots.' This list includes all verbs I have been able to reconstruct
Yurok Syllable Weight1
  • J. Blevins
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 2003
This paper examines syllable weight in Yurok, a highly endangered Algic language of northwestern California. A productive truncation process has only a two‐way weight contrast between light and heavy
An evolutionary approach to lexical competition
The study of regular sound change reveals numerous types of exceptionality. The type studied here has the profile of regular sound change, but appears to be inhibited where homophony would result.
Yurok Verb Classes1
In this paper I detail relationships between verb stems and the conjugation classes to which they belong in Yurok, an Algic language of northwest California. Yurok has four major conjugation classes,
On the Structure of the Lower Numbers in Pre-PA
  • M. Picard
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1986
.1980. Consequential verbs in the Northern lroquoian languages and elsewhere. Papers in Honor of Madison S. Beeler, ed. K. Klar, M. Langdon, and S. Silver, pp. 43-49. The Hague: Mouton. .Forthcoming.
Evolutionary Phonology: The Emergence of Sound Patterns
TLDR
This chapter discusses the evolution of geminates, the role of language in phonology, and some uncommon sound patterns found in this area.
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The Subordinative Order of Proto-Algonquian
  • P. Proulx
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1980
innovation,2 although he does recognize their striking similarity (see below) with those of the Menominee negative order. He further supposes that they originate from objective independent-order
Algonkian-Ritwan: The End of a Controversy
  • M. Haas
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1958
1. Wiyot and Yurok, isolated languages of northern California, are conveniently classed together under the name Ritwan (Dixon and Kroeber, 1913) and it is the purpose of this paper to present
On the Sound-System of Central Algonquian
1. The Central Algonquian Languages form a group which, together with Eastern Algonquian, constitutes the Eastern-Central branch of the Algonquian stock. While the similarity between the Central
Wiyot-Yurok-Algonkian and Problems of Comparative Algonkian
  • M. Haas
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
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This implies a complete misunderstanding of what Sapir actually said as well as some confusion about the devices of nomenclature commonly used by Kroeber, Dixon, Sapir, and others in the early part
Implications of Bloomfield's Algonquian Studies
that his work in this field is of considerable importance.3 But most of those who are quite willing to admit this do so on indirect evidence: since Bloomfield's other work proves him a sound scholar,
Salishan and the Northwest
The Prehistory of Languages
A Supplement to Robins's Yurok-English Lexicon
  • H. Berman
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    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1982
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