Two Genes Predict Voter Turnout

@article{Fowler2008TwoGP,
  title={Two Genes Predict Voter Turnout},
  author={James H. Fowler and Christopher T. Dawes},
  journal={The Journal of Politics},
  year={2008},
  volume={70},
  pages={579 - 594}
}
Fowler, Baker, and Dawes (2008) recently showed in two independent studies of twins that voter turnout has very high heritability. Here we investigate two specific genes that may contribute to variation in voting behavior. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we show that individuals with a polymorphism of the MAOA gene are significantly more likely to have voted in the 2004 presidential election. We also find evidence that an association between a polymorphism… Expand
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