Two Emission Mechanisms in the Fermi Bubbles: A Possible Signal of Annihilating Dark Matter

@article{Hooper2013TwoEM,
  title={Two Emission Mechanisms in the Fermi Bubbles: A Possible Signal of Annihilating Dark Matter},
  author={Dan Hooper and Tracy R. Slatyer},
  journal={arXiv: High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena},
  year={2013}
}
  • D. HooperT. Slatyer
  • Published 26 February 2013
  • Physics
  • arXiv: High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena

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